News

LTP add colour to Stratford skyline

Date: 7th February 2013 | Cat: Group News

Lighting Technology Projects have worked in partnership with Hoare Lea, LandProp and Traxon Technologies to complete a striking illumination for the Strand East Tower, a new 130ft structure on the Stratford skyline.

Lighting Technology Projects has completed a striking illumination of a 130ft structure in Dane’s Yard, Stratford.

The East London tower, which was devised by Inter-Ikea’s property division LandProp for its new multi-million pound Strand East development in Sugar House Lane, acts as a visible marker for the recently regenerated 26-acre site.

Approached as integrators by leading lighting manufacturers Traxon Technologies, following successful collaborations on previous architectural lighting projects, LTP met the brief to devise an installation solution that had been developed from a specification originated by Hoare Lea’s Senior Lighting Designer Min Sang Cho.

In order to propel the light from its source, LTP designed and manufactured a stainless steel and acrylic extrusion, which is both durable and unobtrusive, thus not detracting from the simple, lightweight design and appearance of the timber framework.

Working quickly and efficiently, LTP provided a cost-effective and durable installation solution for the lighting on the Strand East Tower. The intricate illumination has exceeded expectations and has seen the structure become a striking signpost for both the Strand East development and the Olympic Park area.

“The lighting installation on the tower has enabled this landmark structure to be visible at night, as well as during the day.

“LTP and the team have provided us with a sustainable, energy-efficient solution that complements the ethos of the new development - they have been a pleasure to work with,” said Valli van Zijl, Project Manager, LandProp.

The Strand East Tower has since been shortlisted for an accolade in the Exterior Lighting category at the Lighting Design Awards to be held at London Hilton on Wednesday 27 March.

Initial five-year planning permission for the structure has also been superseded by permanent planning permission, meaning one of the most striking focal points on the Stratford skyline is there to stay for many more years to come.

 

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